[Third Stimulus UPDATE] Biden fights to keep the $1400 Stimulus

Joe Biden, making his first official trip as president, said Monday that he was not interested in reducing the size of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill, which includes $1,400 direct payments to Americans.

“The vast majority of the serious people say bigger is better now, not spending less,” Biden said at a CNN town hall in Wisconsin, one of the states that backed Donald Trump in 2016 but flipped in 2020 to the Democrat.

Biden rejected a proposal by 10 Senate Republicans to reduce the size of the package by more than two-thirds, and is willing to enact the measure with only Democratic votes.

A study by S&P Global found that the $1.9 trillion package would restore the U.S. economy to pre-pandemic levels by the second quarter of this year while the Brookings Institution, a Washington research organization, said it would bring back the economy to pre-pandemic levels in the third quarter.

“There is consensus among economists, left, right snd center, that overwhelming consensus is in order to grow the economy, we cant spent too much,” Biden said. “Now is the time we should be spending. Now is the time to go big.”

– photo shows blank checks on an idle press at the Philadelphia Regional Financial Center, which disburses payments on behalf of federal agencies, in Philadelphia.AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File Matt Rourke AP

He spoke about his efforts in 2009 to negotiate a stimulus bill in response to the Great Recession and scaled back spending to attract Republican support. But the limited spending resulted in a more tepid recovery.

Biden acknowledged that small business owners had a legitimate concern with his proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, but said it could be phased in very slowly as to not have a major impact on their bottom line. New Jersey will have a $15 an hour minimum wage in 2026 except for restaurant workers.

“It’s about doing it gradually,” Biden said “No one who works 40 hours a week should live in poverty.”

And he said that there was $60 billion in the stimulus bill earmarked to help small businesses get through the pandemic.

The legislation now is before the House Budget Committee, which will combine the different sections of the bill into a single measure expected to pass the House before the end of the month.

The stimulus bill includes $1,400 checks for individuals earning up to $75,000 and $2,800 for couples earning up to $150,000. The payments would end for individuals earning more than $100,000 and couples making more than $200,000.

The budget committee is involved because the Democratic-controlled Congress is considering the stimulus legislation under a procedure known as reconciliation, which will allow it to pass by a simple majority rather than need 60 votes to overcome a Senate filibuster.

That’s the same procedure used by Republicans when they controlled Congress in 2017 to cut taxes and fall just one vote short of repealing the Affordable Care Act over unanimous Democratic objections.

This time around, GOP lawmakers are the ones deriding the effort to approve legislation through reconciliation, on Monday introduced a resolution to delay passage of the latest stimulus bill.

“It would be irresponsible to pass trillions more in spending when Congress does not even have a thorough and accurate accounting of the trillions of dollars already approved,” said Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri, the top Republican on the House Budget Committee.

Still, strong majorities of Americans support the legislation even if congressional Republicans do not.

In a Quinnipiac University poll released earlier this month, 68% of Americans, including 37% of self-described Republicans, backed the stimulus package while only 24% opposed it. The $1,400 checks were favored by 78% to 18%, including 64% of Republicans.

“The vast majority of the American people like what they see in this package,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her daily press briefing Monday. “And that should be an indication, or should be noted by members of Congress as they consider whether they’re going to vote for it or not.”

[Covid-19] Stimulus checks will be in your hand within 3 weeks!

Congress passed the $2 Trillion Stimulus bill that will help with the economic crisis caused by the Cornavirus pandemic.

What Does This Mean For You?

This means that single tax payers will receive $1,200 each and couples will receive $2,400. For each dependent taxpayers will receive an additional $500 for each qualifying child.

When Will You Receive The Money?

The checks and direct deposits are set to reach taxpayers within the next 3 weeks so keep your eyes open for your direct deposit or paper check to arrive. If you owe back child support you can expect to not receive a stimulus check. Those that are on social security are still eligible to get the cash though.

Will you get another check?

Although under the current bill, this is just a one time payment and no further checks are set to be disbursed. It is possible that there will be another bill passed later on, releasing more funds to the taxpayers. Everyone with a social security number is eligible to receive this relief funding as long as you were not claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return.

Didn’t file your 2019 tax return yet?

If you did not file your 2019 tax return yet, then the irs will look at your 2018 tax return to determine the amount you are eligible to receive. Single tax payers who made less than $75,000 and couples who made less than $150,000 will receive the full amount. If your total gross income is above the threshold amount then your stimulus payment would go down $5 for every $100.

Americans Not Likely To See Stimulus Check Until At least May 2020

Legislation to provide direct financial checks to many Americans, expand unemployment insurance, offer health-care providers additional resources

Lawmakers struck a $2 trillion stimulus deal early Wednesday that includes sending checks directly to individuals amid the coronavirus crisis — but it will likely take until at least May before the money goes out. Under the plan as it was being negotiated, single Americans would receive $1,200, married couples would get $2,400, and parents would see $500 for each child under age 17.

Americans most likely will not see any sign of the Coronavirus ( Covid-19 ) check until at least May.

However, the payments would start to phase out for individuals with adjusted gross incomes of more than $75,000, and those making more than $99,000 would not qualify at all. The thresholds are doubled for couples.About 90% of Americans would be eligible to receive full or partial payments, according to estimates by the Tax Policy Center. Lawmakers set aside $250 billion for the so-called recovery rebates.

Qualifying income levels will be based on 2019 federal tax returns, if already filed, and otherwise on 2018 returns. (Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin earlier this month delayed the filing deadline until July 15.) There are provisions in the bill to include those who don’t earn enough to file returns, but some people may be missed, said Howard Gleckman, a senior fellow at the center.

Under the legislation being negotiated, lower- and middle-income Americans would receive just over two-thirds of the benefits, Gleckman said. An earlier version of the bill would have given lower-income households less or no assistance.

As for Mnuchin’s recent promise to send the checks in two weeks, that’s not likely to happen.

The Internal Revenue Service has sent out economic stimulus checks before, and although those plans were slightly different, they can offer some insight into how long the process might take.

“Certainly from what we’ve seen in the past, it’s taken a pretty significant amount of time to get checks out after a policy is put in place,” said Erica York, an economist at the Tax Foundation. In 2001, it took six weeks for the IRS to start sending out rebate checks authorized by President George W. Bush’s tax cut. Then in 2008, amid the Great Recession, it took three months for the checks to start going out after the law was signed by Bush. In that case, Americans were required to file their tax return first, in order to get the check. Once they filed their return, it took between eight and 12 weeks to see the money.

Those that had authorized a direct deposit into their bank account likely received their money faster. Those deposits were made over a three-week period in 2008, while paper checks were sent through the mail over a 10-week period, York said.

It’s likely that Americans would receive the stimulus payments faster this time around because more of them file electronically and provide the IRS with their bank information, Gleckman said. Some 88% of individual returns were filed electronically in 2018, compared to 58% in 2008.

But there are other factors that may slow the process. Even absent the coronavirus challenges, the agency is working with a smaller budget and less staff than it had in 2010. Now, because of the coronavirus, the agency has shut down its in-person taxpayer assistance centers located across the country at a time when people are sure to have questions about the emergency checks and other changes.

Treasury announced last week that it is pushing back the tax return deadline to July 15. Additionally, Congress created a new tax credit designed to refund businesses that are offering their employees coronavirus-related paid leave.

“It’s just a recipe for confusion,” said Nina Olson, who served as the IRS’s National Taxpayer Advocate from 2001 to 2019.

“There can be a lot of complexity involved in something as simple as sending a checkout,” Olson added.

First, the IRS will have to calculate each person’s payment amount. Then, it will need the correct direct deposit information or mailing addresses. To get the money to people who don’t usually file tax returns, it might have to request that information from the Social Security Administration or Veterans Affairs. In 2008, those people were required to file a return anyway in order to get their rebates.

Meanwhile, the IRS will inevitably be fielding calls from Americans concerned about when their check will arrive and whether they took all the necessary steps to receive the money. In 2001, the agency sent out letters to taxpayers telling them they didn’t have to do anything in order to receive their check. But instead of staving off calls, the notice had the reverse effect. It resulted in the agency’s first 1 million-call day, Olson said.

Later in 2008, after the economic stimulus checks were sent out, Olson testified before Congress, telling lawmakers that they should fund a new unit within the agency that would be dedicated to facilitating new and emerging initiatives. She argued that it would free up other employees to focus on improving the existing systems and executing the day-to-day work of the agency — but that never happened.